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February 01 2012

January 19 2012

finkregh

Forbidden

 so sorry...

Google is temporarily blocking this Scroogle server.

Please wait ten minutes before trying again.

Yes, Scroogle is upset with Google.
1. Google handles 1 billion searches per day, while Scroogle handles 350,000 searches per day. This means that Scroogle is 0.035 percent of Google's load.

2. Google uses 900,000 servers, while Scroogle leases just six low-end dedicated servers.

3. Google has billions and billions of dollars in the bank, while Scroogle is a recognized public charity and survives on modest donations averaging $43 per day.

4. For more than seven years, Scroogle has always made serious efforts to detect and block any and all bots. Almost every Scroogle searcher is a live person clicking on a mouse. Yet Google treats Scroogle like a bot because they see the traffic from our six IP addresses as higher than normal. Searching Google with a bot is against Google's terms of service, but Scroogle users are not bots.


Is it "Terms of Service" for Google, or is it "Terms of Monopoly"?
Sorry...

July 22 2011

Zwei-Faktor-Authentifizierung mit Google Authenticator und des kleinen Mannes Nucular Code Sealed Authenticator System - netzsheriff.de

Google hat letztes Jahr fuer Google Apps Accounts optionale Zwei-Faktor-Authentifizierung, oder, wie sie es nennen, "Bestaetigung in zwei Schritten", eingefuehrt. Zusaetzlich zu dem was man weiss, seinem Passwort, benutzt man fuer die Authentifizierung beim Login noch etwas dass man besitzt: (s)ein Handy. Dazu bekommt man entweder von Google eine SMS mit einer pseudozufaelligen Ziffernfolge, oder diese wird von einer App auf dem Telefon alle 30 Sekunden neu erzeugt. Entsprechende Apps gibt es fuer Android, iPhone und Blackberry.

Zusaetzlich bietet Google ein PAM Modul an,[...]

June 29 2011

June 23 2011

finkregh
We are pleased to announce that we have launched support for Jingle
XEP-166 and XEP-167 for Google Talk calls to and from Gmail, iGoogle, and Orkut.  We have also added the same level of support to libjingle (http://code.google.com/p/libjingle), which is used by many native clients.  From this point on, it will be our primary signalling
protocol, and the old protocol will only remain for backwards
compatibility.  We also plan to soon update Google Talk on Android to
speak Jingle, but we do not plan on updating the Google Talk Windows
application.

We suggest all clients that interop with Google Talk to switch to
using Jingle rather than the old protocol.  We will remain backwards
compatible with legacy clients by continuing to speak the old protocol
as well.  If you wish to continue working with legacy clients, such as
the Google Talk application for Windows, you may also wish to continue speaking the old protocol.  But the future is Jingle, and the old
protocol will eventually go away.

Finally, we are still working on implementing XEP-176 (ICE-UDP).  In
the meantime, you'll need to use our draft-06 version of ICE, which is
implemented both in libjingle and in libnice, two open source
libraries.

I hope that this will be a support to the Jingle community and futher
our efforts to have open standards for voice and video communication.
Announcing Jingle support at Google

January 27 2011

finkregh

The entertainment industries’ quest to root out piracy on the Internet has yet again resulted in commercial censorship. A few weeks ago Google announced that it would start filtering “piracy related” terms from its ‘Autocomplete‘ and ‘Instant‘ services and today they quietly rolled out this questionable feature.

Without a public notice Google has compiled a seemingly arbitrary list of keywords for which auto-complete is no longer available. Although the impact of this decision does not currently affect full search results, it does send out a strong signal that Google is willing to censor its services proactively, and to an extent that is far greater than many expected.

Among the list of forbidden keywords are “uTorrent”, a hugely popular piece of entirely legal software and “BitTorrent”, a file transfer protocol and the name of San Fransisco based company BitTorrent Inc. As of today, these keywords will no longer be suggested by Google when you type in the first letter, nor will they show up in Google Instant.

All combinations of the word “torrent” are also completely banned. This means that “Ubuntu torrent” will not be suggested as a user types in Ubuntu, and the same happens to every other combination ending in the word torrent. This of course includes the titles of popular films and music albums, which is the purpose of Google’s banlist.

Google Starts Censoring BitTorrent, RapidShare and More | TorrentFreak
Reposted bytladesignz tladesignz

November 04 2010

finkregh
November 3, 2010: Here we go again...

We regret to announce that Google changed their output format once again. The last time this happened was in July, and we were down for five days. During that time we looked for the simplest remaining Google format we could find, reprogrammed our parser, and ended up with something that worked. However, the file we fetched from Google was three times more bloated for the same information, as compared to the previous format we used, and we are still not happy about this.

Now it looks like even more bloat. We have to take a closer look at the new format and see if we can program around it. Check back in a day or two.
Scroogle is having problems with Google

August 23 2010

finkregh

8.8.8.0/24 is the prefix that serves one of Google’s Open DNS servers, which is available at 8.8.8.8.
A few hours ago 8.8.8.0/24 was announced by AS30890 (EVOLVA Evolva Telecom s.r.l.), a provider from Romania.

This ‘Hijack’ lasted for about 7 minutes, and was detected by 14 RIS peers in 4 unique countries. The majority of these networks learned this announcement through AS6939.
8.8.8.8 hijack, open dns hijack, google

This is the second time in a month that Google is affected by a hijack. Last month on July 9th, AS42473 (ANEXIA) a provider from Austria announced a more specific of one of Google’s prefixes.
The prefix 74.125.127.0/24 was announced by AS42473. This is a more specific of 74.125.126.0/23, a prefix that hosts many of Google’s public services.
This announcement was later identified as a copy paste mistake, and quickly resolved after the engineers of AS42473 detected the mistake.

Google's services redirected to Romania and Austria | BGPmon.net Blog
Tags: bgp google

July 02 2010

finkregh
We regret to announce that our Google scraper may have to be permanently retired, thanks to a change at Google. It depends on whether Google is willing to restore the simple interface that we've been scraping since Scroogle started five years ago. Actually, we've been using that interface for scraping since Google-Watch.org began in 2002.

This interface (here's a sample from years ago) was remarkably stable all that time. During those eight years there were only about five changes that required some programming adjustments. Also, this interface was available at every Google data center in exactly the same form, which allowed us to use 700 IP addresses for Google.

That interface was at www.google.com/ie but on May 10, 2010 they took it down and inserted a redirect to /toolbar/ie8/sidebar.html. It used to have a search box, and the results it showed were generic during that entire time. It didn't show the snippets unless you moused-over the links it produced (they were there for our program, so that was okay), and it has never had any ads. Our impression was that these results were from Google's basic algorithms, and that extra features and ads were added on top of these generic results. Three years ago Google launched "Universal Search," which meant that they added results from other Google services on their pages. But this simple interface we were using was not affected at all.
Scroogle is having problems with Google

// FUUUUUUUU
Reposted bykrannixpenpen

May 11 2010

finkregh

We regret to announce that our Google scraper may have to be permanently retired, thanks to a change at Google. It depends on whether Google is willing to restore the simple interface that we've been scraping since Scroogle started five years ago. Actually, we've been using that interface for scraping since Google-Watch.org began in 2002.

This interface (here's a sample from years ago) was remarkably stable all that time. During those eight years there were only about five changes that required some programming adjustments. Also, this interface was available at every Google data center in exactly the same form, which allowed us to use 700 IP addresses for Google.

That interface was at www.google.com/ie but on May 10, 2010 they took it down and inserted a redirect to /toolbar/ie8/sidebar.html. It used to have a search box, and the results it showed were generic during that entire time. It didn't show the snippets unless you moused-over the links it produced (they were there for our program, so that was okay), and it has never had any ads. Our impression was that these results were from Google's basic algorithms, and that extra features and ads were added on top of these generic results. Three years ago Google launched "Universal Search," which meant that they added results from other Google services on their pages. But this simple interface we were using was not affected at all.

Now that interface is gone. It is not possible to continue Scroogle unless we have a simple interface that is stable. Google's main consumer-oriented interface that they want everyone to use is too complex, and changes too frequently, to make our scraping operation possible.

Over the next few days we will attempt to contact Google and determine whether the old interface is gone as a matter of policy at Google, or if they simply have it hidden somewhere and will tell us where it is so that we can continue to use it.

Thank you for your support during these past five years. Check back in a week or so; if we don't hear from Google by next week, I think we can all assume that Google would rather have no Scroogle, and no privacy for searchers, at all.

— Daniel Brandt, Public Information Research, scroogle AT lavabit.com
Scroogle has been blocked


// NOOOOEZ!

April 22 2010

finkregh

Google won't allow the co-inventor of Unix and the C language to check-in code, because he won't take the mandatory language test.

Between 1969 and 1973, Ken Thompson implemented a version of the Multics system at Bell, called Unix, with Dennis Ritchie. At the same time he also developed the C language. The speed and simplicity of C helped Unix spread widely. Both have subsequently become quite popular.

Google hired Thompson to create a new language, Go. But Google also requires all of its recruits to pass a language test. According to Thompson, he hasn't quite got round to it yet - and so can't submit code.

The snippet emerged in a book called Coders At Work, published last September. We don't know if the information is still current, or whether Thompson has finally allowed himself to be subject to a humiliating examination on the language he invented by an acne-scarred, know-it-all Oompa-Loompa who is absent-mindedly flicking paper pellets into a Starbucks cup while Twittering.

C language inventor spurns Google's language exam • The Register
Tags: C google

April 01 2010

finkregh

Helvetireader², the minimal & anti-social theme for Google Reader, is now out. Sort of. It’s an unfinished and ongoing project, but it’s in a ‘ready as it’ll ever be’ state.

hr

Helvetireader is simply a hosted user stylesheet for Google Reader served via a user script. It aims to make the interface a clean, minimal experience where you’re not assaulted by an array of colours, lines, social features and buttons. As it removes these bits, and is designed for the expanded view only, you may not like it.

Helvetireader 2 ° The Hickensian ° Hicksdesign

December 11 2009

December 09 2009

Bruce Schneier antwortet auf Eric Schmidts Neusprech

If you have something that you don’t want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place.

–Eric Schmidt, Google CEO

Too many wrongly characterize the debate as “security versus privacy.” The real choice is liberty versus control. Tyranny, whether it arises under threat of foreign physical attack or under constant domestic authoritative scrutiny, is still tyranny. Liberty requires security without intrusion, security plus privacy. Widespread police surveillance is the very definition of a police state. And that’s why we should champion privacy even when we have nothing to hide.

–Bruce Schneier, Sicherheitsexperte

Mehr dazu findet man auf Bruce Schneiers Blog.

Googles Geschäftsprinzip tausche Daten gegen Dienste mag im kleinen Rahmen sicherlich legitim sein — genügend Wettbewerb vorrausgesetzt, wir sprechen aber nicht von irgendeiner Firma, sondern von Google, dem Branchenprimus mit einer geradezu gigantischen Marktdurchdringung. Es kann einfach nicht sein, daß die einzige Wahl besteht zwischen dem digitalen Erimiten oder dem virtuellen Strip zu Gunsten eines Konzerns.

Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes.

Wir schauen den Advent eines neuen Microsoft — mächtiger jedoch, und ebenso wie damals sehen wir uns Legionen willfähriger Zeitgenossen gegenüber, die für ein paar Geschenke ihr Leben prostituieren.

Reposted bysicksin sicksin

December 01 2009

October 16 2009

September 02 2009

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