Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

November 24 2010

High Scalability - High Scalability - Strategy: Biggest Performance Impact is to Reduce the Number of HTTP Requests

educe the size and frequency of network communications, which will make your pages load faster, which will improve performance enough that you can use HTTPS all the time, which will make you safe and secure on-line, which is a good thing.

July 22 2010

ImperialViolet - Overclocking SSL

In January this year (2010), Gmail switched to using HTTPS for everything by default. Previously it had been introduced as an option, but now all of our users use HTTPS to secure their email between their browsers and Google, all the time. In order to do this we had to deploy no additional machines and no special hardware. On our production frontend machines, SSL/TLS accounts for less than 1% of the CPU load, less than 10KB of memory per connection and less than 2% of network overhead. Many people believe that SSL takes a lot of CPU time and we hope the above numbers (public for the first time) will help to dispel that.

ImperialViolet - Overclocking SSL

In January this year (2010), Gmail switched to using HTTPS for everything by default. Previously it had been introduced as an option, but now all of our users use HTTPS to secure their email between their browsers and Google, all the time. In order to do this we had to deploy no additional machines and no special hardware. On our production frontend machines, SSL/TLS accounts for less than 1% of the CPU load, less than 10KB of memory per connection and less than 2% of network overhead. Many people believe that SSL takes a lot of CPU time and we hope the above numbers (public for the first time) will help to dispel that.
Reposted byn0g n0g

June 11 2009

Moserware: The First Few Milliseconds of an HTTPS Connection

Convinced from spending hours reading rave reviews, Bob eagerly clicked "Proceed to Checkout" for his gallon of Tuscan Whole Milk and... Whoa! What just happened? In the 220 milliseconds that flew by, a lot of interesting stuff happened to make Firefox change the address bar color and put a lock in the lower right corner. With the help of Wireshark, my favorite network tool, and a slightly modified debug build of Firefox, we can see exactly what's going on. By agreement of RFC 2818, Firefox knew that "https" meant it should connect to port 443 at Amazon.com:

May 17 2009

ssl/ssh multiplexer

There is a funny little hack out there called sslh, which lets one accept both https and ssh connection on the same, one port. It lets me connect from inside my corporate proxy, which allows outbound connections on port 443, using Putty, while still being able to serve Web pages over https. There are two problems with sslh: * It's in Perl. That means it's pretty RAM hungry, and probably not very fast. * It doesn't manage privilege dropping, which is rather questionnable. The obvious solution to both problems was to re-implement it in C, because that's what geeks do.
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl