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September 01 2010

My IPv6 address is 2002:ca51:fc74::1: IPv6 email autoreply facility

Luckily, I got the domain “v6-mail.com”. Logically, the email account for autoreply function is “autoreply@v6-mail.com”. I continued to configure my DNS to handle MX and AAAA records. Next, I installed Postfix on a dual-stack Linux server with 6to4 tunnelling and I forced Postfix to listen to IPv6 address only. Then came the most difficult task. How to enable autoreply function on the user “autoreply”. I used .forward and vacation but the problem is vacation only reply to sender once within a day and any other subsequent email received from the sender will not be replied. I recalled that flushing vacation.db will clear all previous locked records so I added an cron job to do “/usr/bin/vacation –I” on a per minute basis. This solved all problem plus it added anti-spam feature. If the sender sends more than one request to “autoreply@v6-mail.com” for testing, only one autoreply message will be delivered within a minute.

August 11 2010

finkregh
[02:43:26] <rewt> ipv6 causes ozone depletion
[02:43:39] <rewt> just look at the trends of ipv6 uptake and ozone levels
[02:44:56] <ardya> ipv6 use caused that glacier tail to break off in Greenland
— irc://irc.freenode.org/ipv6
Tags: ipv6 humor

August 10 2010

IPv6 Network Address Translation - Packet Life

Renumbering Avoidance

Use: Without NAT, an organization which has addressed its network using provider-assigned (PA) public address space must re-address its entire network if it desires to switch to a new upstream provider. This is obviously an incredibly labor-intensive, lengthy, and disruptive procedure. To avoid this, many organizations address their internal structure from private RFC 1918 address space and NAT to public addresses at edge routers. Should they need to switch to a new provider, only the NAT translations rules must be changed.

Alternative: Organizations which utilize provider-independent (PI) address space (which is allocated directly from a registry) are not affected by this, as switching to a different upstream provider does not require renumbering. However, the use of PI address space contributes to growth in the global routing table.
Tags: ipv6 nat

IPv6 Network Address Translation - Packet Life

Renumbering Avoidance

Use: Without NAT, an organization which has addressed its network using provider-assigned (PA) public address space must re-address its entire network if it desires to switch to a new upstream provider. This is obviously an incredibly labor-intensive, lengthy, and disruptive procedure. To avoid this, many organizations address their internal structure from private RFC 1918 address space and NAT to public addresses at edge routers. Should they need to switch to a new provider, only the NAT translations rules must be changed.

Alternative: Organizations which utilize provider-independent (PI) address space (which is allocated directly from a registry) are not affected by this, as switching to a different upstream provider does not require renumbering. However, the use of PI address space contributes to growth in the global routing table.
Tags: ipv6 nat
finkregh
> What if DNS configuration is fat-fingered on one router
> but not the other.

"Things will break if configured wrongly" is a funny argument to me.
Re: RFC 5006 status
Tags: ipv6 rfc
Reposted bysicksin sicksin

June 14 2010

Test your IPv6.

Test your IPv6 connectivity.
Reposted byfaselipv6-groupMiGriathalis

June 11 2010

IPv6 CPE Survey | RIPE Labs

This article is an attempt to collect and present up-to-date information on the IPv6-readiness of Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) from various vendors. This is an ongoing project, and we are currently seeking feedback from as many vendors as possible.

February 19 2010

WrapSix

WrapSix is quite revolutionary piece of software because it makes possible to reach IPv4-only servers from IPv6-only networks. Thanks to WrapSix you can prepare your network for the moment when the majority of Internet servers will run IPv6. When the IPv4 traffic disappears, you can silently remove WrapSix from your network – without any further change to your users.
Tags: ipv6 ipv4 network

February 10 2010

finkregh

Last month, IANA allocated the 1.0.0.0/8 and 27.0.0.0/8 networks to APNIC (the Internet registry for the Asia-Pacific region), pushing the total IPv4 address space utilization above the ominous 90% mark. Passing this benchmark should not come as a surprise to anyone, given the painfully slow adoption of IPv6. But what's interesting about the first range in particular is the amount of junk traffic already present.

As part of an effort to de-bogonise this newly allocated address space, RIPE, in cooperation with APNIC, made some test advertisements to the global BGP table for several prefixes with 1.0.0.0/8. Specifically, these networks included 1.1.1.0/24 and 1.2.3.0/24. Why these networks? Because they contain the novel (and illegal) IPv4 addresses 1.1.1.1 and 1.2.3.4, of course.

Shortly after announcing the routes to the world, RIPE's RIS was flooded with over 50 Mbps of traffic destined for what is still an unallocated network; it should not appear on the global Internet.

The RIS RRC from which we announced 1.1.1.0/24 has connections to AMS-IX, NL-IX and GN-IX. The ... image shows the incoming traffic on the AMS-IX port (10 MBit), which was instantly maxed out, mostly by traffic coming towards 1.1.1.1. The AMS-IX sflow graphs suggested that all together our peers were trying to send us more than 50 MBit/s of traffic. Most of this traffic was dropped due to the 10 MBit limit of our AMS-IX port.

And of course, no routing experiment is complete without pretty charts:

destaddresses.png

[...]

RIPE plays with 1.1.1.1 and 1.2.3.4 following APNIC allocation - Packet Life
Tags: RIPE RFC fail ipv6
Reposted bykrannixcoloredgrayscalemondkroetekdomkesicksinfaselyetztts

December 03 2009

1-wire meets IPv6 « shapeshifter.se

A project I’ve been hacking on for a while is a self-contained 1-wire to IPv6 bridge based on an Atmel AVR ATmega644 and the ENC28J60 Ethernet controller from Microchip. 1-wire: is a serial bus from Dallas Semiconductor/Maxim that only requires 1 data line, there are a number of cheap sensors and other devices for this bus. The strength of this bus is not its speed but that it supports large ranges (up to 300 meters). Also, each 1-wire device has a permanent unique 64-bit serial number.

December 01 2009

November 17 2009

'/proc/sys/net/ip*/conf/all/* does not actually affect interfaces' - MARC

I was unpleasantly surprised last night that a rogue machine managed to alter the IPv6 default route of one of my servers, despite my sysctl configuration, which disables RA for "all" interfaces during the boot sequence. It also changes the "default" values:

October 21 2009

October 14 2009

October 11 2009

Lava's IPv6 VLSM / CIDR Reference Chart

# Useable addresses: Network size minus two for Network & Broadcast and: # IPv6 uses 8 sets of 4 hex values, 16 bits each (128bit total) # /48 ISP "site assignments" have 65k possible subnets: bourne$ for a in {1..65536}; do printf "%04X\n" $a; done # Withing a /48, any combination of /49 ---> /64 are valid supernets (departmental, facility, function, other organizational model): $ ipv6gen 2001:0DC6:FF2B::/48 63|more # ...normally three or four more hosts are used for: 1) Switch VLAN1 2) Router Interface or 3) Two HSRP interfaces at .253 & .254 # "Route Summarization" = "Route Aggregation" = "Supernetting" # "terminal ip netmask-format [bitcount|decimal|hex]" on Cisco IOS to show netmasks as Dotted Decimal v.s. Hex # Print this document and keep on wall in cubical at all times. Memorize for fun. Quiz your spouse, offspring, inlaws, etc. # #include <std/disclaimer.h> in the event that a typo within snowballs your entire corporate network

August 26 2009

TAHI Project

Test and Verification for IPv6. Since 1998

August 24 2009

The BIRD Internet Routing Daemon Project

The BIRD project aims to develop a fully functional dynamic IP routing daemon primarily targetted on (but not limited to) UNIX-like systems and distributed under the GNU General Public License. 24.08.2009 - New release 1.1.2! Important core bug fixed - BIRD used as route server in LoNAP and NIX.CZ. What do we support: * Both IPv4 and IPv6 (use --enable-ipv6 when configuring) * Multiple routing tables * BGP * RIP * OSPF (IPv4 only) * Static routes * Inter-table protocol * Command-line interface (using the `birdc' client; to get some help, just press `?') * Soft reconfiguration -- no online commands for changing the configuration in very limited ways, just edit the configuration file and issue a `configure' command or send SIGHUP and BIRD will start using the new configuration, possibly restarting protocols affected by the configuration changes * Powerful language for route filtering

July 23 2009

July 17 2009

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